Tag Archives: mental health

Honoring Vulnerability

This post was originally posted on Dr. Becker-Schutte’s home blog.

 

This year, I had the chance to participate in two fantastic panels at Stanford’s Medicine X conference. You can see the video of the panel on chronic illness and depression here:
The video for the second panel will be available later this fall. The great thing about panels is that you get an authentic discussion, a give and take that is really valuable. The tough thing about panels is that you often think about the things you wish you had said later on (maybe that’s just me).

So, this post is about those things. The things I wish I had said–in both panels. Because at the heart of all of the work I do with my clients, the advocacy I do online, and the writing I share in this blog is this conviction: We are all unique, fascinating, fallible, fragile, resilient human beings. In spite of marketing that suggests that we should never be sad, never feel pain, never experience illness-each of those experiences is a part of being human. In spite of a culture that demands invulnerability and infallibility, we are both vulnerable and prone to mistakes.

So, I wish I had said these things:

  • We need to give our doctors and other health care providers permission to experience and claim their own pain, fear, sadness and vulnerability.
  • We need to talk about the amazing learning potential in our mistakes.
  • We need safe space (in our heads, in our workplaces, in our training environments) to have moments of vulnerability.
  • We need to counter shame and unrealistic expectations.
  • We need to challenge the damaging perfectionism that pervades our healthcare system.
  • We need to respect the courage it takes to admit when you are hurting, or scared, or depressed, or anxious.
  • We need to support one another’s humanity more and better.

The statement I made that was tweeted the most was about the need to decrease stigma around depression and other brain health struggles–both in medical patients and in medical providers. In order to decrease stigma, we need to increase our understanding that vulnerability is a fundamental human experience AND our compassion and empathy for the pain and difficulty that vulnerability can bring.

I’ve been having a conversation about vulnerability with the #MedPsych tweetchat community over the past week. We’re continuing that conversation tonight at 9:30 pm ET. You are welcome to join us.

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Medicine X and the Sneaky Impact of Stigma

Ten days ago, I had the privilege of joining the participants at Standford’s 2014 Medicine X conference.  I’ve written about this conference on my practice blog before, and it is a gathering with lofty aims.  The conference was initially envisioned as a space to explore how health and emerging technology support one another.  Over the three years it has been running, Medicine X has become the leader among healthcare conferences at integrating patient voices into the planning and narrative of the experience.  This year, Medicine X invited some discussion of brain health related issues.  One panel focused on the interaction between chronic illness and depression, and another focused on how brain health issues cut across diagnoses to be a “missing link” in whole person healthcare. I was thrilled to participate in both of these panels, and advocate for an issue that I believe is essential as we move into the future of healthcare.

Participating in these panels was a joy–I shared the stage with some courageous advocates whose stories are very powerful.  However, my participation also reminded me of a critical topic.

Stigma is the elephant in the room when we are talking about integrating brain health more fully into healthcare. 

I have written a bit about healthy privilege and the stigma of illness, so I won’t repeat that here.  There is also a great deal of powerful writing about the more obvious ways that brain health issues are stigmatized.  One of my favorite reminders of this is a pointed cartoon:


This cartoon cuts to the heart of the most obvious brain health stigma–which seems to be founded on the idea that brain health can be improved just by “adjusting your attitude” or “trying harder.” That piece of stigma is very real. So is the piece of stigma that has cost individuals facing brain health challenges their jobs or their relationships.

However, what I saw at Medicine X this year was a more challenging and subtle component of stigma. I saw an assumption that brain health issues are something that patients deal with, not a challenge that confronts health care professionals. People were willing to talk about providers who were burned out. They were much less willing to talk about providers who might be facing depression, anxiety, unsustainable stress levels, etc. That language still seemed taboo. And that’s a problem. As long as brain health challenges are something that “they” experience, stigma will continue. As long as it is not acceptable for a medical student to own that the intense demands of their training are difficult emotionally as well as practically, stigma will continue.

I also saw brain health discussed as something “other.” Medical students talked about not knowing how to approach a referral for brain health services without upsetting their patients. Until a referral for a brain health consultation is as automatic as a referral to an endocrinologist, stigma is still at play.  Until we are trained to think about the brain and our social functioning as a vital component of health that we wouldn’t dream of ignoring, stigma will still be an issue.

I don’t want this post to be construed as pessimistic.  At Medicine X, I heard medical students ask questions that showed they truly want to be part of this conversation.  I saw patients who discussed their depression  as a medical challenge on the same stage with diabetes or autoimmune disorders.  I saw that there is so much hope and potential for the future.

I also saw that we have work to do.  Let’s keep the conversation going. Shining a light is how we challenge the grip of stigma.

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Can We Talk about Brain Health?

If you’ve read some of the earlier posts in this blog, you know that InnoPsy co-founder Susan Giurleo and I started this project to give psychologists and other mental health specialists a platform.  Our profession has been marginalized in the health care system.  I think that is partly because there is stigma about the conditions we treat.  I think it is partly because some folks trained in a medical model view psychology as a “soft science.”  I think it is partly because our profession hasn’t done a fantastic job of educating other health professionals and the general public about how much impact we can have on health and social function.

But around here, just acknowledging the problem isn’t going to be enough. The goal of InnoPsy is to change the status quo. To make a difference.

We had a really interesting discussion during chat a few weeks ago. We were talking about the link between physical and mental health.  And we started to ask, “If there is so much stigma attached to the words “mental health,” why not change the words?”

Because really, it makes more sense on some level to talk about brain health.  All of our emotions and cognitive processes originate in our brain.  The brain is the recipient and interpreter of our internal and external neural feedback.  And, in terms of helping other health professionals understand what we do, starting with a recognized organ and body system seems like a good idea.

Right now, if you do a web search on the phrase “brain health” you will find lots of advertising for sites like Lumosity, which provide “brain training,” or for organizations dedicated to Alzheimer’s support and research.  Go ahead, give it a try.

However, you won’t find anything (in the first few pages of search, anyhow) that references cognitive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, stress management or any of the other issues typically treated by psychologists.

And that makes me wonder–how did we get this disconnected?  How did we take so many of our brain’s functions and just push them off to the side?

And why aren’t we using the phrase brain health to describe these issues?

What do you think?

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Come on In, The Water’s Fine!

I believe psychologists have an important role to play in bringing about health care change. And I am so very excited to be partnering with innovative thinker and psychologist Dr. Susan Giurleo to begin exploring how that might happen.

After a discussion in which several psychologists were sharing frustration over our wish to contribute more and our sense that our voices aren’t heard in other spaces, we realized that we could do something about that. We could build a space and reach out to others from that platform. I talked about this a bit more in my post “Why #InnoPsy?

Now it’s time to actually get it started.

The Medicine and Psychology Tweetchat started January 7th 2014 as the #InnoPsy chat, and continues every Tuesday at 9 pm ET/6 pm PT. Why a Tweetchat? Because Twitter is a platform that allows for global conversations–and it’s where I met most of the innovators that I admire and respect.

You’ve never participated in a Tweetchat, you say? No problem. First of all, you need a Twitter account. They are free and easy to establish. If you’re starting your first account, you’ll be prompted to follow some folks. You could start with Susan Giurleo (@SusanGiurleo) and I (@DrBeckerSchutte). You can also follow the @MedPsychChat account for chat topics and moderation.

Once you have your Twitter account up and running, I would recommend using another tool to participate in the chat. My favorites are Tweetchat or T.chat. Either of these tools allows you to enter a hashtag (ours is #MedPsych) and you will see the chat in a full screen window, which makes it easy to follow along.

So, if you want to join a #MedPsych chat, then pull up your device of choice at 9:30 pm ET on a Tuesday night.  Open your Tweetchat, T.chat, or other Twitter interaction tool.  Type the #MedPsych hashtag into the search bar, and jump on into the conversation.  We’ll ask for introductions, and then be off and running on our topic of the night.

Not a psychologist or a doctor? No problem! #MedPsych is open to all stakeholders (and if you live in a body, you are a healthcare stakeholder).  We believe that a big-tent community is how we will truly find solutions to the challenges that we face in healthcare.

The first chat included some community brainstorming about topics we wanted to explore in a discussion about innovation in psychology.  Now, we’ll introduce a new topic each week.

I hope we see you there! I’m excited to explore new ideas in psychology, medicine, and integrated healthcare.

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